Result of the Peloponnesian War - Answers

As mentioned above, in Sophocles’ drama, god of war Ares gets the blame for the plague (lines 190–191). The particularity of this reference (), it seems that Sophocles correlates the epidemic that strikes Thebes with the plague of Athens, which, according to Thucydides, came about as a result of the Peloponnesian War ().

Do you believe the result of the Peloponnesian War was a tragedy? or was humanity somehow better off because of it? why or why not?

In later Classical times, Sparta along with , Thebes and had been the main powers fighting for supremacy against each other. As a result of the Peloponnesian War, Sparta, a traditionally continental culture, became a naval power. At the peak of its power Sparta subdued many of the key Greek states and even managed to overpower the powerful Athenian navy. By the end of the 5th century BC it stood out as a state which had defeated at war the Athenian Empire and had invaded Persia, a period which marks the Spartan Hegemony.

What was a result of the Peloponnesian War

This Site Might Help You. RE: What were the results of the peloponnesian war? In 404 B.C., during the reign of the ThirtyTyrants, Isocrates fled to the island of Chios where he operated a small school ofrhetoric. As a result of the Peloponnesian War, Isocrate's father, Theodorus lost most ofhis property and wealth. So, in 403 B.C. Isocrates returned to Athens where, as a resultof financial need, he became a forensic locographer, writing speeches for others todeliver in the courts. After only six speeches, Isocrates discovered that he lacked thepractical gifts for winning cases and abandoned the profession. Isocrates would laterdisavow his career as a locographer scorning the profession.

82-84) has painted as the result of the Peloponnesian war

In later Classical times, Sparta along with Athens, Thebes and Persia had been the main superpowers fighting for supremacy against each other. As a result of the Peloponnesian War, Sparta, a traditionally continental culture, became a naval power. At the peak of Sparta's power, it subdued many of the key Greek states and even managed to overpower the powerful Athenian navy. By the end of the 5th century it stood out as a state which had defeated at war both the Persian and Athenian Empires, a period which marks the Spartan Hegemony. During the Corinthian War Sparta faced a coalition of the leading Greek states: Thebes, Athens, Corinth, and Argos. The alliance was initially backed by Persia, whose lands in Anatolia had been invaded by Sparta and which feared further Spartan expansion into Asia. Sparta achieved a series of land victories but many of her ships were destroyed at Cnidus by a Greek-Phoenician mercenary fleet that Persia had provided to Athens. The event severely damaged Sparta's naval power but did not end its aspirations of invading further into Persia, until Conon the Athenian ravaged the Spartan coastline and provoked the old Spartan fear of a helot revolt. After a few more years of fighting, the "King's peace" was established, according to which all Greek states would remain independent, and Persia's Asian border would be free of the Spartan threat. Sparta entered its long-term decline after a severe military defeat to Epaminondas of Thebes at the Battle of Leuctra. This was the first attested time that a Spartan army would lose a land battle at full strength. As Spartan citizenship was inherited by blood, Sparta started facing the problem of having a helot population vastly outnumbering its citizens. The alarming decline of Spartan citizens was commented on by Aristotle. Yet even during her decline, Sparta never forgot its claims on being the "defender of Hellenism" and its Laconic wit. An anecdote has it that when Philip II sent a message to Sparta saying "If I enter Laconia I will level Sparta to the ground", the Spartans responded with the single, terse reply: "If".

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